Treatment

Pain Reduction #2

July 14, 2016

Could coagulation be causing your myalgia and pain?

Babesia and bartonella infected my red blood cells, resulting in a lack of oxygen transportation to organs, and especially my brain. This explained the cramping, pain, and dementia-like brain fog. Blood smears showed the bartonella sitting on the red cells and babesia inside of them. See picture below, noticing the misshapen red blood cells, and their “sticking” together. The purple is biofilm.

blood


After understanding the damage such infections create, it became clear that my anemia was hemolytic in nature. I had a low PTT rate which explained the “thick” blood and “lumps” I felt going through my chest. All the previous heart rate monitor tests, ECGs, ultrasounds, and blood work did not show red blood cell infections as the source of my cardiac symptoms. The heavy limbed, walking through wet cement sensation was due to a lack of oxygen and “thick” blood. If I had waited much longer for a proper diagnosis and treatment, these infections of the red blood cells would have led to a stroke or severe neurological damage.
If you suffer from infections of the blood, a doctor should be testing your PTT and sed. rate monthly. If my PTT is over 30, I am comfortable; under 30 and more bolouke and Lovenox is needed. I can tell when my blood is thick with fibrin or the cells are coagulated, I am exhausted and the pain rears up.

Such injections will space the cells apart, making it easier for medications to get to each cell, and it prevents babesia and bartonella from “jumping” to new red cells, slowing reproduction and infection rate. Dr. Horowitz and Stephen Buhner discuss Heparin therapy in their books. 

Mostly I want people to know that you do not have to use the large needled pre-filled syringes of Heparin or Lovenox. You can ask for vials of the meds and small, short insulin syringes. The injections are much easier and waaaaaaay less painful this way.

needle

After understanding the damage such infections create, it became clear that my anemia was hemolytic in nature and the pain could be reduced by dealing with the coagulation. A low PTT rate explained the “thick” blood and “lumps” I felt going through my chest. All the previous heart rate monitor tests, ECGs, ultrasounds, and blood work did not show red blood cell infections as the source of my cardiac symptoms. The heavy limbed, walking through wet cement sensation was due to a lack of oxygen and “thick” blood. If I had waited much longer for a proper diagnosis and treatment, these infections of the red blood cells would have led to a stroke or severe neurological damage.

 

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