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Why Is Lyme So Difficult To Treat?

May 29, 2017

Why is Lyme disease so difficult to treat? Why can doctors prescribe years worth of antibiotics for acne but not for a bacterial infection of Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme bacteria)? Lyme bacteria can be treated within the first six weeks of a tick bite, but what about the other bacterial and parasitic infections ticks carry? If easily treated, why are so many people denied immediate care, moving on to chronic, debilitating stages of the disease?

There are adamant deniers of chronic Lyme. A story I like to relay involves a Lyme specialist and her most aggressive critic. Both highly educated and recognized medical physicians, my doctor tested for and treated chronic Lyme. The other physician spent much energy denying the existence of Lyme and smearing her as a “quack.” Then one day his son became ill. No testing could point to what was wrong. No treatment was working. His son grew dangerously worse. In the end, it was determined his son had Lyme. And who was the first person this man took his child to? Yep, my Lyme specialist. And she was able to help. After a hefty helping of humble pie was served, the once critical physician became a great admirer of my Lyme specialist.

Until it happens to you or your child, the Lyme pandemic may seem unlikely or far-fetched. But Lyme disease can be debilitating and has a history of ruining lives. Although there is no one cure or protocol that works for every case, people can find help. Unfortunately it takes lots of research, investigation, trial and error, patience, and money to get well. This article highlights the reasons Lyme is difficult to diagnose and treat, why treatment in mainstream medicine is often denied, and what people can do to seek help.

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What is Lyme Disease?

September 9, 2016

Vector-bourne pathogens include more than Lyme bacteria (of which there are hundreds of strains). North Americans are being infected with other bacteria, as well as parasites. To learn more about Lyme, bartonella, and babesia, continue reading:

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